I am a graphic designer that helps ideas take flight!

Laurie Lobdell
Blog

 

QuilledAlphaGroupABC

I have continued to develop my skills at quilling and paper typography by working on a calendar and now individual letters of the alphabet.  In order to create papergraphics of specific typefaces, I am using a combination of techniques I have found online.  First I choose the letter or word I want to create and then select the size and font in Adobe Illustrator.  Then I change the font to outlines only, reflect the image and print it out.  For the next step I use a small styrofoam board and straight pins to outline the letterform, and then wrap the paper around the pins to create the reversed shape.  The final step is to quickly and evenly apply glue to the paper and then place the backing sheet (the color paper the design will be done on) onto the letterform and let it dry for several minutes.  At that point I carefully remove the backing sheet and the graphic comes with it, now facing the right way.

 

QuilledAlphaAw

 

QuilledAlphaBw

 

QuilledAlphaCw

After learning about Quilling (paper filigree art) and specifically being inspried by Yulia Brodskaya, I decided to give this a try.  At first I wanted to find a way to digitally create this art form, thinking that it would offer a new level of design manipulation.  I definitely learned a lot about the 3D effects menu in Illustrator, but could not find a way to make the designs look like real paper.  After many failed attempts, I decided that “virtual” paper rolls just don’t have the same impact as the real thing.  Here’s my attempt to create a quilled version of my name on the computer:

DigiQuilname

Close up look at virtual paper rolls:

DigiQuilCloseup

 

Perhaps someone out there has the skills to do this, but I realized it wasn’t me.  Rather, I didn’t have the time/need/patience to figure it out.  I decided to try my hand at the actual paper craft, which Yulia has termed “papergraphics,” and this was much more satisfactory – and FUN!

Here’s how my name turned out in the papergraphic:

LAURIEnameQuilledW

 

Not bad for a first attempt.  As you’ll see, the more I worked on this craft, the better results I was able to achieve.  I’ve tried a couple of logos (and these are NOT authorized or commissioned pieces, just me trying things out) and some typographical treatments.  I’m excited to continue to practice and improve and I hope that this can become part of my unique offering as a graphic designer!

 

Washington State University logo:

WazzuLogoQuilledW

 

H2O at Home logo:

H2OlogoQuilledW

 

Typographic:

LOVEheartQuilledW3

WINEbottleQuilledW3

 

 

Close-up view:

WINEcloseupQuilledW

 

As a creative person, I often struggle with “over-designing” things.  I have so many ideas and sometimes it’s hard to scale back.  The proper utilization of white space can make a good design into a great one.  White space allows the viewer’s eye points to rest and can help establish the hierarchy of your design.

 

Here is a before and after example of a promotional poster.  The project was to announce the upcoming release of a collector’s edition set of books and CD’s for the two “Alice” stories.

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By simplifying the design, I was able to establish a better visual hierarchy and draw attention to the most important information on the poster.  It also has a cleaner, more professional look than the original.

I love the idea of Infographic Design…taking a lot of data and turning it into something that not only looks good, but gets the point across quickly and easily.  I’ve done an infographic version of my resume (which I’m now tweaking again) and here’s one I did to help market for my other business.  I run a craft shop on Etsy.com and one of my most popular, but least understood, products is a Diaper Cake.  I created the icons and built this infographic using mainly Illustrator, with a little Photoshop as well. Let me know what you think!